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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Jane Mayer
Staff Writer for The New Yorker
CNNW 01/22/2014
Blitzer: He also told you this -- he said, no one has credibly shown any harm to national security. The president himself admitted both that changes are necessary and that he is certain the debate my actions started will make us stronger. Although the President in that long interview with David Remnick in your magazine did say there was major damage to national security. Mayer: He (the President) basically said that there was more damage than good that came out of it. But he has, as Mr. Snowden is saying, said that it has provoked a debate that has been useful in this country. And what Snowden said to me was, I've brought the American public to the table. And he also said, you know, if in fact he's smeared and his reputation is ruined, he said, if I end up in a ditch at the end of the day and reform comes out of this, it will be worth of it.
Jane Mayer
Staff Writer for the New Yorker
CNNW 01/22/2014
Blitzer: He (Snowden) also told you this -- he said, no one has credibly shown any harm to national security. The president himself admitted both that changes are necessary and that he is certain the debate my actions started will make us stronger. Although the President in that long interview with David Remnick in your magazine did say there was major damage to national security. Mayer: He (the President) basically said that there was more damage than good that came out of it. But he has, as Mr. Snowden is saying, said that it has provoked a debate that has been useful in this country. And what Snowden said to me was, I've brought the American public to the table. And he also said, you know, if in fact he's smeared and his reputation is ruined, he said, if I end up in a ditch at the end of the day and reform comes out of this, it will be worth of it.
Anderson Cooper
Host of CNN Anderson Cooper 360
CNNW 01/23/2014
Cooper: We've taken public servants on their word before only to find out they weren't telling the truth or were exaggerating. Listen to this exchange from senator Ron Wyden and director of national intelligence James Clapper. Wyden: What i wanted to see is if you could give me a yes-or-no answer to the question does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans? Clapper: no, sir. Wyden: It does not? Clapper: not wittingly. There are cases where they could Cooper: Again, when the facts finally came to light, we learned that statement by director Clapper was not true. It was false.
Jane Harmon
President of The Wooodrow Wilson Center, former U.S. Representative (D-CA) and former member of the House Intelligence Committee
MSNBCW 01/23/2014
Harmon: Given all of this criticism especially in Europe, it's in the newspaper today that Microsoft is going to start using servers outside the united states so that it can keep people's data safe. And I can just imagine people in the United States wanting to use the Microsoft or other servers outside the United States. So this is becoming -- unmanageable. and my suggestion is at this point that we look for alternatives and that section 215 so far as I understood before the President spoke was something the White House was considering abandoning. The President didn't abandon it he asked a group to look at it. He gave three options. The one that has the most appeal to me which he didn't explain very carefully, in which I’m not sure I can explain, is tagging data so that you can actually find needles without having to have the haystack. Wouldn't that be better? Wouldn't that be reassuring to people?
Jane Harmon
President of The Wooodrow Wilson Center, former U.S. Representative (D-CA) and former member of the House Intelligence Committee
MSNBCW 01/23/2014
Harmon: The contours of the program were reviewed on a regular basis and the FISA court as we have all learned since some of its decisions have been made public has disapproved some things and NSA has deleted data that was collected not in compliance with the program but this program has been looked at a number of times. Federal courts have looked at it. There was a conflict between two courts right now, the D.C. circuit court thinks the program is unconstitutional and other the district court and another district court thinks it is constitutional. So probably this thing will go back up to the Supreme Court.
Jane Harmon
President of The Wooodrow Wilson Center, former U.S. Representative (D-CA) and former member of the House Intelligence Committee
MSNBCW 01/23/2014
Harmon: My own view was and still is, that the program is constitutional but that's only one piece, the second piece is politically, does it make sense and in terms of U.S. security, to have a program which is creating so much dissension in our own country and certainly in a country like this one, Switzerland, Germany, where Davos meeting is being held and causing U.S. communications companies like Microsoft to invent ways to get around the FISA program by telling people in Europe that if they use Microsoft as their carrier, the data from that -- that relationship will not be stored in the U.S. will be outside the reach the NSA program in the west.
Eric Holder
U.S. Attorney General
MSNBCW 01/24/2014
Melber: Also, in a New Yorker interview the President was asked about potential deals of clemency for Edward Snowden which is some NSA officials said should be on the table. He said it is not a yes-no issue. Does that mean a deal of some kind could be possible for Mr. Snowden? Holder: He is a person who is charged, will be charged with a variety of crimes. When he has – legal representation and if those lawyers want to talk about a resolution of the case, we would obviously engage in those conversations. Melber: but -- that means that it is -- you haven't ruled it out? Holder: Clemency, a -- simple, you know, no-harm, no-foul. I think that would be going too far. But in the resolution of this matter, with an acceptance of responsibility, you know, we would always, you know, engage in those kinds of conversations.
Edward Snowden
Whistleblower
ALJAZAM 01/26/2014
Betz: Edward Snowden says national security is not the N.S.A.'s only purpose. In his most recent interview airing today he says the N.S.A. also collect data to help U.S. corporations. Seipel: does the N.S.A. spy on Siemens, on Mercedes on other successful German companies, for example, to prevail, to have the advantage of knowing what was going on in the scientific and economic world?
Edward Snowden
Whistleblower
ALJAZAM 01/26/2014
Snowden: I don't want to pre-empt the editorial decisions of journalists, but what I will say is there's no question that the U.S. is engaged in economic spying. If there's information at Siemans that they think would be beneficial to the national interests, not the national security of the United States, they'll go after that information and they’ll take it. Betz: That interview was was held in an undisclosed location. Meanwhile, a Russian law-maker recently said Moscow plans to extend its offer of asylum to Snowden beyond August.
Rand Paul
Senator (R-Kentucky), Member of Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs
KNTV 01/27/2014
Paul: …he’s a traitor, this and that. I don't assign bad motives to Snowden. I think his motives were good. And I'm not sure he did the right thing or did it in the right way. But I also don't assign bad motives to James Clapper but James Clapper did break the law and he has exposed himself to five years in prison for perjury. So you can't have it both ways. You can't say we're going to throw the book at Snowden and we’re going to ignore perjury to congress by James Clapper. I think they both, if you want to apply the law, the law has to be applied equally.
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